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Subject House plans
Message by sclemens on June 18 2009 at 12:34 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: August 22 2004   Posts: 41   View sclemens's profileProfile Search for other posts by sclemensSearch Quote sclemens's postQuote
The search for the ideal house plan is still underway and while searching I had a thought. Has anyone thought to post copies of their cordwood home plans on this site? Even if they were only available for a fee it would be really helpful to those of us struggling to find a plan that will be approved. In my case, the houses I find I'm unsure of how to convert them to cordwood and post and beam. I understand that everyones home is unique and that is why we all love cordwood but it's so frustrating trying to find a plan. When I have found a floor plan I like I still need the elevation, foundation, electrical,etc. plans. Our building inspector here is very ouchy.Just a thought to throw out there.

Shawn

Message by opsrto on June 20 2009 at 8:10 am  
Location: United States   Joined: June 09 2006   Posts: 30   View opsrto's profileProfile Search for other posts by opsrtoSearch Quote opsrto's postQuote

Shawn

I pretty much did my own. And then redid it and the did it again. I have been in the planning stage for 3 years now. I finnaly have concrete on the ground so the plans wont change much again. Find a plan you like and then tweek it to suite your personnality/ goals and everthing else



Calvin
Stockton Mo
(now in Afganistain)

Message by Alan Stankevitz on June 20 2009 at 8:53 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 14 2002   Posts: 1672   View Alan Stankevitz's profileProfile Search for other posts by Alan StankevitzSearch Visit Alan Stankevitz's homepagewww Quote Alan Stankevitz's postQuote

Hi Shawn,

When we designed our house we used plans from other multi-sided home manufacturers to design our own plans. I used a home-design software packaged from IMSI called 3-D Home Architect. This allowed me to design the house without too much difficulty. In our neck of the woods, I did not need real blueprints in order to build and my software drawings sufficed.

Nowadays the IMSI software has changed so much that it no longer does multisided, 24-inch thick walls and I have found a new package from Punch! software...Home Design Platinum (version 12) that works quite well.

Unfortunately I have yet to recreate my design with the new software, otherwise I would share it.

Here's one thing to remember: A cordwood house is only a cordwood house because of the exterior walls. The rest of the house can be just as conventional as any other house and there are plenty of designs available in book stores and on-line to give you plenty of good ideas.

In almost all cases, there are plenty of plans available that can easily be retrofitted for cordwood construction.

I know this doesn't help you directly, but maybe it will give you a few more ideas to help you design your dream home.

~Alan~

Message by j> on June 26 2009 at 12:14 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 03 2009   Posts: 20   View j>'s profileProfile Search for other posts by j>Search Quote j>'s postQuote

Hi, Shawn,

We are building a 16-side cordwood home with a breezeway that attaches the house to the garage.  We originally planned to do all of the work ourselves but living 3.5 hours away from the location meant a stretched out timeline.  We took ideas from Alan and others who did 16-sided and incorporated some of our own ideas.

My husband and I are in mid-50s and both work in the Twin Cities (MN).  He would like to semi-retire in 3-4 years so he can have time to do many smaller projects that we want to do.  I would like to move to our new home when he semi-retires and work remotely a large % of time which will provide the main source of income (providing I can convince my management). 

That said...our only solution to speed up the timeline (and save on back labor) was to hire the framing done.  We don't have building codes to deal with but hiring framing meant blueprints of some kind.  We were referred to Tony Steineman in St. Cloud, MN.  My son-in-law is in construction there (custom built homes) and they use Tony often for blueprints.  Tony is not an architect nor a structural engineer--but he works for a big lumber yard there and does blue prints on the side.  He knows his stuff. It cost us close to $1,000.00 for prints, but we're glad we did it!  Having discussions with him helped us through many structural decisions. 

The framing crew helped us through other issues/decisions as they completed their work.  The framing crew just finished the garage yesterday--did an awesome job in 8 days.   The house framing won't start for at least a year.

Our garage is 28x40 post & beam with 10' high walls.  It will have 1' thick cordwood walls with sawdust/lime insulation.  (We have in-floor radiant heat in the garage).  We went with room trusses the full length of the garage with stairs to access the upper level.  We have a 16'x28' shop in the back of the building leaving 24'x28' for the garage. (I was able to work remotely for 2 weeks when the framing was being done.  The 2 most exciting weeks ever!!)  During the garage framing, we made a number of changes away from the blue prints --but blueprints provided a basis to have the discussions.

We now have shelter for materials.  My husband & I will do the rest of the work ourselves.  We hope to have walls in place before snow flies...or will close off the remainder walls temporarily with plywood.

Our house and breezeway will have 2' cordwood walls with a basement under the breezeway for food storage.  The house is 16 sided -52' diameter with a 20' diameter structure in the center of the house for multiple rooms and loft in the upper level.  Both garage and house have in-floor radiant heat.  

I could send a couple of views to post without all of the spec information.(Tony-the blueprint guy won't mind at all-good advertising for him.)  I sent an email to Tony asking about posting the full set of blueprints.  

I also have lots of photos of the garage when it was being framed if anyone is interested.  Not sure who/how to get them on the forum or where they need to go.

Thanks!

Julie

 

 



Julie & Greg

Message by Richard Flatau on June 27 2009 at 8:42 am   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1993   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote

HI Julie & Greg,

  What a great resource you have provided.  My son graduated from St. Cloud State, so I learned to love that city on the Mississippi.  It would be helpful for others who wish to use blueprints.  There has been a ton of interest in cordwood from the upper Midwest in the past few months.

   As to sending information to be posted on daycreek.  If you have a website you can post your pictures here by using the Add Image link (see the tree image in the post a reply box).  If not send the pictures as a file attachment (500 pixels x 500 pixels) to webmaster@daycreek.com   If you can save as jpegs and send them by date 062709a that would be even better.

  Our talented webmaster and birder, Alan, will post them when he get some time.  He is very busy with all kinds of other "irons in the fire."  If you want to see his other site go to www.iwishicouldfly.com 

 



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

richardflatau@gmail.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by bikerbeware on June 29 2009 at 9:29 pm  
Location: Canada   Joined: March 06 2005   Posts: 116   View bikerbeware's profileProfile Search for other posts by bikerbewareSearch Quote bikerbeware's postQuote

Shawn, great idea about sharing plans. We have been looking forever for blueprints for something like what we want to build but are having problems finding what we want. I have tried my hand at drawing and so forth but I am not doing a great job. We do need our plans engineered so it might be easier for us to hire a firm to do the work for us. We know what we want and need but are fidgetting with some of the detials. Which some people might be able to help us with....

What size is a good size for a utility room/mudroom? Somehow our original plans have gone from 8 x10 to 12x12. The room would be for laundry, main entrance, and utility room for solar, radiant floor system, pump, water heater, etc. Any suggestions?

We are also wondering if anyone has done a full side in glass. We are quite taken with the A-frame chalet style house with a full front of windows between timberframe. But we struggle with whether we should downsize the windows to include cordwood?

We are trying to design a forever house that will grow with our family and shrink in our old age? any suggestions?

 



Holly
Northern Ontario

Message by j> on July 17 2009 at 9:15 am  
Location: United States   Joined: May 03 2009   Posts: 20   View j>'s profileProfile Search for other posts by j>Search Quote j>'s postQuote

Finally....I'm able to respond to Richard's response on 6/27.  I don't have a website to post the house plans or photos so I emailed them to Alan at webmaster@daycreek.com.  The email contains a sanitized version of plans (no dimensions/specs) and photos of our garage to-date that Alan can post when he has a few spare moments. 

Tony Steineman is the name of the guy we worked with and has given permission to post the sanitized copy of the plans.  Anyone interested in contacting him about designs, here is his contact information.

Anthony (Tony) Steineman
ADS Designs (Residential Drafting & Design)
Sauk Rapids, MN 
320-248-5580
adsdesigns@charter.net

I also included some basic diagrams that we created for our framing crew with detailed specs for front/back wall.

Here is a list of items that we had to make decisions on when framing began that we didn't think about when blue prints were being done.  Once plans and photos are posted, this information below will make more sense.

Additional considerations for Garage –after blueprints were done:

**Eliminated both end trusses and ordered 2 more room trusses for ends.  The trusses on each end were moved in 12" to allow for 12" cordwood walls. Cordwood will run up to the peaks of gables.

**Relocate stairway to inside garage wall due to end trusses being moved in 12”.  Framing crew had to compensate for this change with truss moves.

**Installed radiant heat in garage.  Had to stay 13 inches from edge of cement with radiant heat tubes so not under walls.

**Microlam plate (side walls) sits flush with the outside edge of posts. (Microlam and plate is narrower than cedar posts)

**Because we wrapped soffits under trusses instead of straight across to garage wall, the microlam and plates are exposed. These will be faced with rough sawn white cedar.

**All posts for garage walls were moved in 1" from edge of cement.  Since this wasn’t determined until after trusses were built, trusses extended our wall by a couple extra inches. The extra exposed inches will be faced with rough sawn white cedar like the microlam.

**We had to custom design the post & beam structure for front & back of the garage walls to accomodate 12" cordwood.  (diagrams provided to Alan)

**We stubbed for a bathroom and electrical. Electrical stubs are on wall connected to breezeway so subpanel is close to breezeway and on inside wall. Radiant tubes go under door of breezeway eventually will use path through basement of the breezeway to get to house.

 

Changes for House Plans:

**There will be a basement under the breezeway to provide cool area for canned goods etc. This will also provide a path for radiant heat tubes and electrical to the house. (No basement on house; House & garage have radiant heat)

**Main electrical panel will go in breezeway closet so it can be close to the outside meter and a short distance from the subpanel in the garage.

 

Thanks!

Julie & Greg

 



Julie & Greg

Message by Alan Stankevitz on July 17 2009 at 8:32 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 14 2002   Posts: 1672   View Alan Stankevitz's profileProfile Search for other posts by Alan StankevitzSearch Visit Alan Stankevitz's homepagewww Quote Alan Stankevitz's postQuote
Here are the images/designs that Julie sent to me for publication:

BLUEPRINT:


BACK VIEW OF GARAGE CHANGE - INCLUDES BEAMS & ADDITIONAL POSTS:


HOUSE LOG TRUSS DESIGN:


FRONT OF GARAGE CHANGE - INCLUDES BEAMS & ADDITIONAL POSTS:


UPSTAIRS WITH ROOM TRUSSES:


STAIRWAY:


OUTSIDE VIEW OF UPSTAIRS - END TRUSSES:


OUTSIDE VIEW CORDWOOD WALLS:


INSIDE VIEW OF CORDWOOD WALLS:


FRONT VIEW OF GARAGE:


BACK VIEW OF GARAGE:


~Alan~


Message by Alan Stankevitz on July 22 2009 at 10:18 pm   -  forum moderator
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Here are a few more images sent to me by Julie:

3D House Plans:


Upper Level House Plans:


~Alan~

Message by Richard Flatau on July 23 2009 at 3:39 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1993   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote

  Julie & Greg,

    Wow, love the plans, the pictures and the fact that you gave the architect's name and contact information.  That way folks can contact him directly. 

  The room in the attic will, I'm sure, come in very handy.  Tim & Julie of New London, MN lived above their cordwood garage room-in-the-attic for 2 years. 

   Thank you for sharing.  Thank you Alan for posting.   Keeping the round face of the vertical timber verbiage (flat 3 sides, rounded on the face) in the plans is excellent planning.   Attention to detail.   Nice looking cordwood infill.  Congratulations.

 



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

richardflatau@gmail.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by j> on July 23 2009 at 8:17 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 03 2009   Posts: 20   View j>'s profileProfile Search for other posts by j>Search Quote j>'s postQuote

Now that we're finally at this point with the garage, Greg suggested we consider living in the garage indefinitely and foregoing the house plans.  I'm not in agreement...we'll see what the next two years brings. 



Julie & Greg

Message by dragonsgrave on October 16 2009 at 8:04 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: October 16 2009   Posts: 1   View dragonsgrave's profileProfile Search for other posts by dragonsgraveSearch Quote dragonsgrave's postQuote

My wife Teresa says that "Greg' 'ahhh no!'" Apparently she likes the idea of getting into the house.. We are just to the east of you in Naytahwaush and I have just helped finish the infill in a 2,000 square foot house that Richard was over to see and helped get off the ground. What I see in the plans is super ambitious and it will be a work of art when done. Hope to meet up with you guys and talk techniques... Good to see another cordwood project in the neighborhood..my email is dragonsgrave@hotmail.com .

Over here the vision is to have the first cordwood construction company (that I know of) involved in creating homes for everyone.




Message by Joe Dupere on October 19 2009 at 11:07 am  
Location: United States   Joined: August 19 2005   Posts: 36   View Joe Dupere's profileProfile Search for other posts by Joe DupereSearch Quote Joe Dupere's postQuote

This is a rough floor plan for Sunnywood. The inside dimensions are 40' long by 22' wide for an area of 880 sq. ft. Each of the 'bays' are approximately 8' on the north and south sides, and 11 feet on each east and west side. Of course, there are no internal walls up yet, so who knows what the final floor plan will be. We've already changed it several times!!

Joe

 


Message by BigdaddyGB on April 23 2012 at 11:43 am  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
I was wondering where to get a set of plans for timber framed homes. And how hard would it be to get a set I already have made into timber frame home plans for cord wood building. My wife and I have had plans made up about 15 years ago for our dream house. Now since we have our property that we are paying for and clearing as I type.. We want to build our house the cord wood way with timber framing. But the township requires architectural plans drawn up and lots of copies. So I either have to get our plans changed ( as they were drawn up as a stick build) or buy another set of plans that are similar to ours.

look forward to building my first house

Message by Richard Flatau on April 29 2012 at 2:20 pm   -  forum moderator
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Hey BigDaddy,

I have a friend in the Merrill area of Wisconsin who drew my house plans and also does my Cordwood 3 Bedroom House Plans that I sell as a package deal with my book, Cordwood Construction: Best Practices.

His name is Rob Pichelman and his contact information is:

      Rod Pichelman , draftsman
          715-536-1386
      rpichelman@gmail.com,
            
Rob has also built a cordwood home and is very familiar with changing stick built to post and beam framework for cordwood. He is a draftsman and not an architect, but he can produce detailed house plans for code approval, unless you absolutely have to have an architect draw up your plans.

   If that is the case, then I know another fellow in the area who drew the Cordwood Education Center plans for the Merrill School Forest.

          Rod Cox, architect
          715-355-8260
             rcox.architect@gmail.com,

Both are familiar with cordwood, both have a fine drawing skill set.

One more note: Remember that traditional timber framing is framing without nails and uses dowels and mortise and tenon joints.   Post and beam framing uses mechanical fasteners (screws and such and doesn't require such a high degree of craftsmanship:0)

   With post and beam frame it is easy to double a 6" x 8" x 8' post and make it a 6" x 16" x 8' post for cordwood infill. It is more difficult to do that with a traditional timber frame.


Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

richardflatau@gmail.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by BigdaddyGB on April 29 2012 at 8:48 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
thanks. i will keep them in mind. I believe that my township requires the architect drawings. But I will double check it first before contacting either one of them.

Love the book so far.. Very informative. Can't wait to get my first one under way. Gonna start with a small shed/cabin.


look forward to building my first house

Message by BigdaddyGB on May 23 2012 at 12:04 am  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
well bad news. found out today that about 50% of the 4.75 acres i was purchasing turned out to be wetlands and thus is unbuildable. owners never disclosed this before the contracts were signed but are addiment that they didn't know either... so we renegotiated and came to an agreement that since i have paid for half the amount we initially agreed upon and half of the land is useless, that he's agree to sell me all the land for what I have paid for it up till now. I am getting all 4.75 acres signed over to me this week.. Then the real work begins.

look forward to building my first house

Message by BigdaddyGB on August 11 2013 at 7:50 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
well here is an update. We got the land switched over into our names. we had the land surveyed and found that the original owners were lied to by the township planning board because the original surveyor couldn't do his math right. We have gone from what the township has said was 4.75 acres to 3.9 acres according to our surveyor. I have called around to several places to get other guys to look at it and when i told them who had doe the first one no one would dare to take it on. When i asked why no one wanted to take it on they told me he was the best, the townships don't even argue with him on his dimensions. But I got my flags I now know where my land is and where the wetland are. Next is the fight with the Wetlands office as to how much they will need of my property for the wetlands buffer if any. Hopefully none. We found a nice house to build and hope to get to it some day. If not I am building a one room 24x24 cabin on it and selling it as a hunting lodge. And I'll start looking for a better piece. I love the book so far has a lot of great info in it. i think I will try to get a new shed build out back this coming year.

look forward to building my first house

Message by Richard Flatau on August 12 2013 at 5:01 pm   -  forum moderator
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Big Daddy,

Thanks for sharing and updating us on your story. I hope you get the results you are seeking without too many scars and wounds . Good to hear you are enjoying Cordwood Construction Best Practices, if you are going to build with cordwood, it is a good idea to do it right.

Good luck with your battles and please keep us informed.



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

richardflatau@gmail.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by BigdaddyGB on March 14 2014 at 10:48 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
Well it's been a long road to get here but I am going to start this year working on our future house for retirement. We finally got our answer from the DEP about our wetlands on our land. It falls in a Eagle habitat here in New Jersey and since New Jersey still hasn't removed them from their endangered list they put a 150ft. buffer zone on the land in addition to the area they say is wetlands. All in all the wetlands took a little less than 2/3's of my 3.9 acres but I'll be able to use the buffer zone to a point without any special permits. I found a great source for white cedar here in NJ and was quoted $2000 for 5 cords of Atlantic white cedar which is from 7' -14" by 16' poles. Best I have found so far. My house is kinda shaped like a boom a rang and i figured out from what I could get from the book that I need about 13 cords of wood. the house is 2343 sq/ft one story and planned on 16" walls. Does this sound about right?

look forward to building my first house

Message by Richard Flatau on March 17 2014 at 7:32 pm   -  forum moderator
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Hi Big Daddy,

In order to figure out the amount of wood you need, we need to know the perimeter of the boomerang house. Then you take that perimeter, multiply it by the height of the walls (probably 8') and you have the square footage of wall space. Then divide that by 32 sq. ft. (which is the amount of log ends in a single/face cord 4' x 8' x 16"). So for grins and giggles, lets say you have 150' of perimeter x 8' = 1200 sq. ft of wall space. Divide that by 32 = 37.5 divide that by 3 (number of single/face cords in a full cord) = 12.5 This will give you a ball park figure for the amount of wood needed for your walls (if your perimeter is 150', remember we don't know what your perimeter is so please don't use this answer, it is simply an example. Always add one more full cord (4' x 4' x 8'}, it is a bummer if you run out of wood when you are trying to close it up for winter. If you want to reply with your perimeter we can help with the calculations.   
Good luck with your project and please send some pictures along for the daycreekers!


Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

richardflatau@gmail.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by BigdaddyGB on March 29 2014 at 8:09 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: May 23 2010   Posts: 9   View BigdaddyGB's profileProfile Search for other posts by BigdaddyGBSearch Quote BigdaddyGB's postQuote
well we changed our plans and have sent off a set to the architect you recommended. they are approx. 35 x 75
all one rancher

look forward to building my first house

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