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Subject White Earth Reservation Cordwood Home
Message by Richard Flatau on October 01 2009 at 10:17 am   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1955   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote
White Earth Reservation Cordwood Home

    In the spring of 2008 the Minnesota Community Development Corporation made contact, to inquire as to the possibility of building a cordwood home on the White Earth Reservation in NW Minnesota (50 miles east of Fargo, ND).   The original idea was to build a daycare and early childhood center and a home, but, for various reasons the home came first.

   After many, many months of consultation and conversation, we were on our way to Naytahwaush to begin construction on September 22, 2009.   The General Contractor, Robert Zahorski of Clearwater Building and Design was ready with the foundation (radiant in floor heat in a sand bed, using off peak electric hours—3 cents a KW); post and beam cedar frame, 12/12 pitch roof with 2 large bedrooms and a half bath and storage (shingled), a well, a mortar mixer, mortaring supplies and power!) What a great guy to juggle all these parts of the project.
   The Native American Group Leader Bill, had been working to gather a cordwood masonry crew.   Bill is a very talented individual with a skill set that defies description.   Needless to say, he and Robert became our confidants and close friends. We are grateful for time we shared with them and the crew. The staff at MMCDC was most excellent in providing everything needed to make this a success. Kudos.

    Here are a few pictures of the private residence. We had visitors most everyday, since this is not a “spec house” but one that has a unique personality and footprint.   The goal is to provide labor opportunities and pride of ownership in a community directed operation.



Anishinaabeg Cordwood Crew [I'd like to start a football team with this group of guys.]



We are using a Portland based mortar mix. 3 coarse sand, 2 soaked softwood sawdust, 1 Portland cement, 1 Type S hydrated lime. This is my favorite mix and has been used successfully for the past 30 years on all my cordwood buildings.



This 3 bedroom home is architecturally drawn and is using Best Practices in all it's building components (energy heel trusses, latest cordwood mortaring techniques, cedar log ends & posts, radiant in floor heat, closed cell foam for the center cordwood cavity, room in the attic trusses, etc.)





   We used Sandy Clidara's Foam Insulation innovation and are very happy with the results. I will share some of that information in another post. Here is a teaser picture of Bill the Great Foamer.




All the best,

Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources, LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-212-3268

Cordwood books and information

Message by MegDCL on October 01 2009 at 10:44 am  
Location: United States   Joined: August 03 2005   Posts: 156   View MegDCL's profileProfile Search for other posts by MegDCLSearch Visit MegDCL's homepagewww Quote MegDCL's postQuote
Very cool.. I'm intrigued by those slabwood-looking posts. Running the insulation between the interior and exterior posts must help keep the wall warmer. We have some air infiltration on the sides of our solid (doubled 8x8) posts. Are the corner posts unmilled and hidden from the inside?

-----------------------
He who laughs last thinks slowest.

Our Family Blog

Message by Richard Flatau on October 01 2009 at 12:59 pm   -  forum moderator
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Hi Andy & Meg,
The posts are left rounded on one side. The other 3 sides are squared up. The round side gives a vertical log cabin effect. The side posts are about 7" deep and so with two of them we have a 2" gap in the middle, we are foaming that, but one could use sawdust insulation.
As to the corner posts, there is a smaller log behind the big corner log, placed at 16". The idea is to bring a 12" log end on one side and then meet it with a 16" log end. I am looking for a picture that will better explain my words.

Richard Flatau

Message by Richard Flatau on October 02 2009 at 3:47 pm   -  forum moderator
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Hey Andy & Meg,
Here is the picture that shows the 2 corner posts. One big (out front) one smaller on the inside. This was devised by the architect and the General Contractor. To make this work a 12" log end has to be cut for one inside vertical course (the one in the middle as you look at the picture), then a 16" piece of cordwood is inserted up to that 12" piece. The 16" piece goes where you see the keyways.    Hope the picture helps it make sense.



The posts were squared on the interior 2 sides, but in this corners case there was not much to square up.
   
   I'd like to come north next summer and see your lovely cob and cordwood place. Jan & Joel (from Besemer) told us about their visit, as did Wayne Higgins.

All the best,

Richard Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources, LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870

Message by sandman on October 03 2009 at 6:33 am  
Location: Canada   Joined: August 25 2002   Posts: 521   View sandman's profileProfile Search for other posts by sandmanSearch Visit sandman's homepagewww Quote sandman's postQuote

Nicely done! Quite the project, I see that they went all out, built up off the ground, large roof soffit overhang, slab with radiant heating.

     I'm glad to see they used the closed cell foam. We have enjoyed our warm home insulated with closed cell foam for 5 years now. Even though there is an initial outlay of money invested, it is well worth it in savings and in level of comfort.

Here in Quebec Canada (2 hour north of NY state) we especially appreciated it at times like these.








I would install foam if you plan on keeping your home for more than 5 years It's a one time investment that lasts the life expectancy of the house, needs no maintenance, has no mechanical parts that can break down or running Costs


"The Cordstead"
http://thecordstead.blogspot.com/
Sandman

Message by Richard Flatau on October 03 2009 at 8:40 am   -  forum moderator
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Hi Sandy,

That was quite some snowstorm you weathered. I can see why closed cell foam has worked so well for you.

   Sandy has written an excellent article for the Cordwood Conference Papers 2005 about closed cell foam in single wall cordwood construction.   It is at the following link
http://geocities.com/sandange2000/index.html

   We followed Sandy's instructions to a tee at the White Earth Cordwood Home project.   Our Native Program Director, Bill (see smiling pix above) was able to use his creative genius to come up with a few additional techniques that worked well for us.

    Bill wondered about gettting the foam to all the cavities and voids in the cordwood wall. He came up with the idea to drill holes down into the center of the cordwood with an 18" (5/8" wide) wood boring drill bit. He did this every 18" or 24" in the walls "linear run."



    Then rather than clear, flexible tubing to inject the foam, he used more rigid PVC tubing (3/8").    As the cavity started to fill, he pulled the tube up slowly all the way to the top. This worked very well to fill the voids completely.


   The foam is left to run out over the top by a few inches. Then this can be cut back to meet the next mortar bead. We did 18" to 24" of wall at a time, all the way around the perimeter. We had to let the mortar harden, so we waited until the next morning to foam.



   The projected R-value of the wall is approximately R-35 when taking into account the 6.2 per inch R-value of the foam and the 1.5 inch r-value of the cedar & sawdust enhanced mortar.

Here is the foam as it flows to the top of the log ends. It looks like little yellow footballs.


   
   Sandy was incredibly helpful throughout the project, answering my emails and my phone calls. We read his CoCoCo Papers article over and over to make sure we got it right.

Would we do it again, absolutely.

Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources, LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-212-3268

Cordwood Books & Information

Message by Richard Flatau on October 03 2009 at 10:04 am   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1955   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote

 For those who may be interested;  here is the link to the foam we used.  

http://www.energyefficientsolutions.com/foamproducts.asp#AC   

It is the Quick Cure type listed in the first couple of slots. 

 There are other "spray-it-yourself" foam companies out there.  Do a google search and ask questions.  Shipping can be very expensive.   This company gave us a break on shipping and a discount on the kits.

  The cost was approximately $4000+ for the whole "kit and caboodle."

  Sandy has a method of figuring out how much foam one would need.  Sandy please advise.

 

 



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

Flato@aol.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by Richard Flatau on October 03 2009 at 10:16 am   -  forum moderator
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Here is a picture to show the beauty that reigns supreme in this gorgeous area.


Twilight on South Twin Lake near Naytahwaush.

Here is Becky, Richard, Robert(General Contractor) & Bill (Program Director) on a cold frosty morning in October. Note the blankets protecting the cordwood from frost (donated by Bill).




Cordwood Books and Information

Message by sandman on October 04 2009 at 9:40 am  
Location: Canada   Joined: August 25 2002   Posts: 521   View sandman's profileProfile Search for other posts by sandmanSearch Visit sandman's homepagewww Quote sandman's postQuote
Hi Richard and All

I have added this article to my papers collection and will gladly post a copy here for those interested.

Estimating Closed Cell Foam in Single Log cordwood Wall Application

    This will give you a Ball Park idea since there are so many variables in individual building styles.
The Variables
1)     The insulating cavity is coarse and irregular & can vary up to 1 inch in spots.

2)     The percentage of Logs to Mortar make up of the cordwood wall surface area. eg. 40 % mortar and 60% logs ends. Tighter joints mean less foam, wider joints mean more. Keep in mind you need a minimum space between logs to accommodate the foam installation tubes

3)     Preparation of the foam tanks can affect the yield of the kit and expanding properties of the foam during installation. Some foam tanks need to be heated up prior installation, overnight preferably, & shaken before & during installation.

4)     The top of some Cordwood walls may have a 3-4 inch mortar edge to help level the top plates & may require more foam insulation.

5)      If you have an inner and an outer top plate you will also need foam to fill in the cavity.

These variables listed are some, but there can easily be more, depending on the individual wall design.
Numbers Crunch
Measures
Square Feet: Length x Width, measures surface area
Board foot: = 1 square foot ( 12” x12”) by 1” thick

Go through the following steps to calculate how many board feet of foam you would need for you walls.

1)     Estimate your finished wall area in square feet.      Eg.      1,000 sq ft.
2)     Estimate the width of your insulating cavity.            Eg.           6 inches
                               Multiply it to get the board feet                    6,000 Board Feet

3)     Estimate Log to Mortar ratio Eg.60% log/ 40% Mortar
And use the % of your mortar (the insulated area)   Eg.               x40%
                  Estimated Board feet of foam in wall cavity               2,400 BF
Divide by Foam Kit, sized in Board feet     Eg.            600 BF
                                      Number of 600 BF kits needed                    4 kits
Foam Kits
   Are sold in Board Foot measures. We bought the 600 Board foot Kits
    The kits we bought were 2 parts chemicals that were mixed in the injection guns nozzle as it exited the gun.
    They were made up of 2 large tanks (Look like BBQ propane tanks) with long hoses, injection gun & several spare nozzles.
   Better to buy a little extra than to run short. Any extra can be used in the attic area around tight roof truss areas to insulate.



"The Cordstead"
http://thecordstead.blogspot.com/
Sandman

Message by Steve Krug on October 06 2009 at 8:34 am  
Location: Antarctica   Joined: January 24 2002   Posts: 321   View Steve Krug's profileProfile Search for other posts by Steve KrugSearch Visit Steve Krug's homepagewww Quote Steve Krug's postQuote

A couple of questions, respectfully submitted:

I'm assuming you used foam between the cordwood for insulating/infiltration. If you have a material with high R-value (the foam) next to a material with a lower R-value (the cordwood), heat, being the lazy bugger it is, will take the easy path thru the wood, thereby negating the (very exspensive) R-value of the foam. Wouldn't work better to create a thermal break with the foam?

Once the wood checks won't you have infiltration problems anyway?

With a hydroscopic material (wood) next to a closed cell foam aren't you causing the dew point to happen in the wood? Once the wood is moistened isn't the R-value is decreased even more?

I'm all in favor of spending more money up front to permanently lower the long term impact of a building, but it would seem to me the $4K spent on the foam just dosen't get you much bang for the buck.

It is a beautiful building, I really enjoyed the pix!



cap'n steve

Message by MegDCL on October 06 2009 at 9:17 am  
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Thanks for the info, Richard! That home really is a work of art.

I'm not recalling a Jan and Joel... Are you perhaps thinking of Richard and Phyllis from Bergland? We were privileged to get a tour of their beautiful round cordwood home before we built ours, and just had a nice visit with them this summer.

We'd love to get a chance to meet you.. Though, our home probably isn't quite what you're used to seeing.

-----------------------
He who laughs last thinks slowest.

Our Family Blog

Message by Richard Flatau on October 06 2009 at 9:28 am   -  forum moderator
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Hi Captain Steve,

   Thank you for your interesting questions.   I would start by saying that you trained the General Contractor on this crew in all things renewable and energy efficient and solar.  Robert Zahorski rented your home and eventually bought it near Ladysmith.  He talked fondly of you as we built.  We decided, that based on performances by two homes in Canada (Ontario & Quebec) that this would be the "toasty ticket" for northern MN.  Not what you would call a statistically significant sample, by any stretch of the imagination.

    I am theorizing that the cordwood will do its usual "wicking away" of moisture like the short log ends do.   The wood being used here is cedar and the "straw effect" (the log ends acting like a bunch of strawberry milkshake straws to wick moisture in or out) of the relatively short log ends (16") seems to work well for cordwood walls.   This is certainly not a scientific statement (perhaps a botanical one), just an experiential one.  My cedar log end home of 30 years acts that way.   When a wall gets wet from rain or snow, it doesn't stay wet, but dries out quickly. 

  As to the checks that develop in log ends:  We filled each of the primary checks with foam before they were mortared into the walls, and if a random check opens up we will stuff it on each side.   This is part of the maintenance of a cordwood home.   Check stuffing. 

  Having discussed this in detail with Sandy Clidaras: who has lived in his closed cell,  foam insulated, single wall cordwood home for 5 years now,  he writes of the lack of air infiltration, the warmth of the walls and the ease of heating.   This has become more of an 'ancedotal method' than a laboratory tested method, which come to think of it, is a lot of what has fueled the cordwood movement.   However, the book Cordwood and the Code: A Building Permit Guide was an attempt to put all the cordwood testing data in a cohesive document. 

   In the final estimation this was an attempt to give the gal who is purchasing this home the best bang for her buck.   Hopefully we did that, time will tell.

   Avast and shiver me timbers Matey,

Captain Cordwood


Message by Steve Krug on October 06 2009 at 10:01 am  
Location: Antarctica   Joined: January 24 2002   Posts: 321   View Steve Krug's profileProfile Search for other posts by Steve KrugSearch Visit Steve Krug's homepagewww Quote Steve Krug's postQuote

Shiver me timbers!?, these days its "shiver me foam core vacuum bagged fiberglass coated hull with carbon spars", does't quiet roll of the tongue the same!

If I remember right, Ann and Robert sold thier boat to buy our house, not sure he ever forgave me! I do have a picture of Robert feeding Iguanas (just before he went swimming with the shark), nothing to do with cordwood but I'm sure the crew up a White Earth would get a chuckle out of it...



cap'n steve

Message by Alan Stankevitz on October 06 2009 at 10:47 am   -  forum moderator
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ArrrrRichard,

How thick are theee walls Matey? And how wide rrrrr thee morrrrtarrrr joints?

Arrrrlan

Message by Richard Flatau on October 06 2009 at 11:03 am   -  forum moderator
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   Pirates and their questions!  Geesh!

1.     16" cedar cordwood log ends (treated with borax, exterior ends   stained with a UV blocker: Lifeline from Permachink)  To reduce darkening.

2.    Mortar joints are 4.5 inches.

3.    Insulation cavity is 7"

4.    The Fomo Foam that we used is listed at R 6.2 per inch.  http://www.energyefficientsolutions.com/Quick_Cure.asp?item=FOAM605

   Watch out for capn steve, iguanas & for sale homes & boats.   Forewarned is forearmed. 

Captain Cordwood

 


Message by Steve Krug on October 06 2009 at 12:41 pm  
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Alan, did you know your "r" key is sticking?

cap'n steve

Message by Alan Stankevitz on October 06 2009 at 2:34 pm   -  forum moderator
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That's a featurrrrre of the new Micrrrrosoft Errrrgonomic Pirrrrate Keyboarrrrrd. It makes it easy to type if yourrrr hand has been rrrreplaced by a hook.Arrrr......

Message by bikerbeware on October 06 2009 at 8:10 pm  
Location: Canada   Joined: March 06 2005   Posts: 116   View bikerbeware's profileProfile Search for other posts by bikerbewareSearch Quote bikerbeware's postQuote

All of this is wonderful. Great job on the house.

I have been trying to spark interest in alternative building methods in the First Nation communities in Northern Ontario. Many of the communities suffer from substandard housing and on overall lack of housing to meet needs. I will be forwarding the link to this discussion to the editor of an Anishinabek newspaper to see if it will spark some more interest amongst community leaders.

 



Holly
Northern Ontario

Message by Rocky Top on October 07 2009 at 1:40 am  
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When I attended a workshop at Rob Roy's home in NY several years ago, there was a Mohawk couple there learning cordwood methods.  I believe they were from near Montreal.  I wonder if they ever built their home?  I seem to remember that they lived in a Mohawk community and were researching ways of building inexpensive, natural houses. 

Enjoying the pirate talk, by the way! We missed national "Talk Like A Pirate Day" by a few weeks;  it was Sept 19th, I think.



Melissa at Rocky Top in PA

Message by j> on October 14 2009 at 6:28 pm  
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Oh my gosh!  Naytahwaush is practically in our back yard!  Probably 10 miles cross country from where we are building our cordwood home/garage on Long Lost Lake!  How exciting!  We would love to trek over there next Spring on the 4-wheeler to check it out!

Do you have contact information for Robert Zahorski.  We may be looking for a roofing crew next Fall or Spring of 2011 for our house.   

Pics of our garage taken earlier this year and house plans are at this link ("House Plans" Forum topic): 

http://www.daycreek.com/dc/asp/forum2002/display_topic_threads.asp?ForumID=2&TopicID=1997&PagePosition=3

It was pretty exciting to see this posting!

 



Julie & Greg

Message by Richard Flatau on October 15 2009 at 8:38 am   -  forum moderator
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Hey Julie & Greg,
  Here is an email from Robert.   Synchronicity?
Richard Flatau  www.daycreek.com/flatau
 
  Robert's picture is the first picture as you scroll backward from this posting.  He is kneeling on the left.  He is also an accomplished shark diver and sailor.:0) He has been a real treat to work with:  He has good interpersonal skills, works well with all the construction people, does his research, and is an excellent builder.   
 
Hi Richard,
 
        Do you want to hear something funny ?   When Ann and I first move into the area our first home was on the North end of Long Lost Lake.  It was so beautiful back then but then came the blow down of 1995 and we lost a couple hundred trees just in our lot...  but we know the lake very very well.
    Please forward our contact information.
   
Thanks,
 
 
Robert Zahorski
Clearwater Build & Design LLC
Lic# 20634136
19035 Sherman Shores Rd
Audubon MN. 56511
218-439-6012
218-849-8548 Cell

Message by j> on October 15 2009 at 6:44 pm  
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Wow!  Small small world!  We know exactly where on Long Lost Lake he used to live.  We're southwest corner.

 Thank you so much, Richard!   We'll be giving Robert a call.

 



Julie & Greg

Message by Richard Flatau on November 10 2009 at 9:18 am   -  forum moderator
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Howdy,
Here are some current photos of the home on White Earth. The scheduled completion date is December 1, 2009.   
   The home has a unique cordwood quality to it. Massive, pleasant, and individualistic.   It has some wonderful design features: the sand bed heat storage under the home, the 12/12 pitch room in the attic trusses, the entrance door facing east and subtle Ojibway motifs throughout.

Here the cedar post has been wrapped so the ceiling could be sprayed with textured paint.



The exterior is looking fine!





Deep window boxes to accommodate the 16" cedar walls.




This is how the building was wrapped for the extreme cold that occurred in early October. All the Portland based mortar came through with flying colors. With Lime Putty Mortar this would have had to be wrapped and heated for 30 days.



What a good looking home!



I will provide more photos as the home is completed on the interior.

Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-536-3195

Cordwood Books and Information

Message by Richard Flatau on November 10 2009 at 9:26 am   -  forum moderator
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Bill Paulson, the Program Coordinator for the cordwood home at Naytahwasch, a very gifted artist, designed and implemented the bear paw in the wall. The first photo is how he laid it out, the second is how it looks in the wall.

Bill is an amazingly talented individual. He even repaired my defective starter in my truck on the building site and let me use his truck for the weekend. Thank you Bill.






Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-536-3195

Message by Mountain Man on November 10 2009 at 1:48 pm  
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Cord wood Eye Candy. Totally cool. Heh Richard, I meant to ask you when you first posted, could you elaborate a little more on that "corner post" explanation. (I think its the 7th photo down from the top). It looks like the concrete block wall is already 16" wide (at both sides of the corner) so I don't quite follow how the 12" vertical course came into play.

I know in the past you showed a hand drawn top end view of a corner detail using back to back 8" upright post beams. That design required mortering the stackwall against the 16" side first, then mortering the opposite corner which "overlapped" the previously mortered wall by 8".

Thank you



Sam from Seattle

Message by ChipRiver on November 11 2009 at 8:33 am  
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This house / project made it on Minnesota Public Radio today.

Here is a link to the MPR website that has pictures and the radio segment.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/11/10/cordwood-homes/

Congratulations to all involved!

 

 



Nancy

Message by Richard Flatau on November 13 2009 at 10:00 am   -  forum moderator
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Mountain Man Gary wrote: Heh Richard, I meant to ask you when you first posted, could you elaborate a little more on that "corner post" explanation. (I think its the 7th photo down from the top). It looks like the concrete block wall is already 16" wide (at both sides of the corner) so I don't quite follow how the 12" vertical course came into play. I know in the past you showed a hand drawn top end view of a corner detail using back to back 8" upright post beams. That design required mortering the stackwall against the 16" side first, then mortering the opposite corner which "overlapped" the previously mortered wall by 8". Thank you   Sam G.





Hi Sam, Here is a visual explanation of the corner posts. As you can see there are two posts, one large, one smaller, set to receive the log ends. Now, the first row of log ends on each side of the post will need to be cut to length in order to butt up against the post. The first log end will set in directly over the metal anchor bracket in the photo.
    Since the posts taper, the first log ends may be 11" or 12" and as you go up the wall, they will get longer, since the post gets more tapered. So, to do this you will have to have your chain saw or a chop saw handy.   Does that make any sense?
We also "toenail screwed" the end of the log-end that butted up against the post to the post. This kept them rigid as we mortared up.
This was not my design, but the architect's. I think a simple two-post system would have been easier, but the architect achieved his goal of having the full round log visible from the exterior. It was a bit of extra work, but it sure does look attractive.

Happy Trails,   

Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-536-3195

Cordwood books and information

Message by Mountain Man on November 13 2009 at 3:48 pm  
Location: United States   Joined: January 04 2009   Posts: 30   View Mountain Man's profileProfile Search for other posts by Mountain ManSearch Quote Mountain Man's postQuote

Thank you for the explanation and additional photos. I now see why a vertical course of shorter logs were required. I guess I was not sure why that smaller diameter post was even used on the inside. Maybe it provides additional support for the floor joist/ truss system above. Speaking of that upper floor joist/roof truss connection that last photo makes me scratch my head some more. ( I am getting good at that ) Those side ways U shaped 2 x 4 braces are what I speak of. Maybe those will help transition the top of the cordwood wall once it is completed that high. Sorry for the barrage of questions Richard, I do enjoy learning from these various building methods which I hope will help me with my future project. Maybe another photo from the inside of that upper wall area I spoke of. (with the cordwood wall completed)

Thanks again 



Sam from Seattle

Message by Richard Flatau on November 30 2009 at 12:36 pm   -  forum moderator
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Quote: Originally posted by Mountain Man on November 13 2009

Speaking of that upper floor joist/roof truss connection that last photo makes me scratch my head some more. ( I am getting good at that ) Those side ways U shaped 2 x 4 braces are what I speak of. Maybe those will help transition the top of the cordwood wall once it is completed that high. Sorry for the barrage of questions Richard, I do enjoy learning from these various building methods which I hope will help me with my future project. Maybe another photo from the inside of that upper wall area I spoke of. (with the cordwood wall completed)

Thanks again 



Hi Sam,
   Here are a few pictures of how that U shaped w x 4 braces look on the inside. The cordwood came right up to the horizontal bottom of the brace (insulation was placed from above) and then a wood fascia was placed over the horizontal side of the brace. This runs parallel to the cordwood.

Here you can see the braces and the cordwood coming up to them. This will be filled with insulation.



Here is the finished product.   A nice touch. It separates the drywall on the ceiling from the cordwood with a clean horizontal line.



Hope this makes it clearer? The house is almost finished inside and out and I hope to have some new photos in a week or so of this amazing home.


Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

Flato@aol.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by Richard Flatau on January 09 2010 at 1:26 pm   -  forum moderator
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Howdy,

The White Earth Cordwood home is now finished and being lived in. The family is offering to show the home to interested persons.   

   Here is the most excellent flyer made up by the General Contractor, Robert Zahorski. If you are planning on attending, please email me flato@aol.com or call 715-212-2870, so I can apprise the family of potential visitors.



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources, LLC
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870

Message by Richard Flatau on January 19 2010 at 1:26 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1955   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote

Direction Corrections from Robert. 

Subject: Correction on directions to White Earth, MN open house

 [From Robert]

Hello,        Please note the correction on the Flyer in the directions to Veronica's Cordwood Home coming from Detroit lakes.  You need to take a Right and go East on 113 off of hwy 59 North. (The original directions had told you to turn West.)

 Sorry for any inconvenience.

 Robert Zahorski (General Contractor)

Please email me at flato@aol.com if you are planning on attending, so I can give Veronica a heads up on your arrival.  She will have many of her extended family there on both days. 

 The cordwood home is basically in the center of the White Earth Reservation.  It is south of Naytahwaush.  If you get lost just stop at the Pinehurst Resort   Pinehurst is right on County Road 4 about a mile from the cordwood home.  We stayed there when we trained the cordwood crew and the framers/roofers/drywallers stayed there also.  They have a good lunch/dinner menu so you may want to stop in an have a bite to eat.  Tell them the "Cordwood Flatau's" said "hey."   Go Vikings!

http://www.pinehurstlodge.net/

 Richard & Becky Flatau
Cordwood Construction Resources LLC
W4837 Schulz Spur Dr
Merrill, WI 54452

flato@aol.com
www.daycreek.com/flatau
715-212-2870
715-536-3195


Message by Richard Flatau on February 04 2010 at 7:56 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1955   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote
Lots of interest in the rescheduled open house. I will let you know as soon as a new date is set.


Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau

Flato@aol.com

Cordwood Construction Online Bookstore

Message by Richard Flatau on February 19 2011 at 12:19 pm   -  forum moderator
Location: United States   Joined: January 15 2002   Posts: 1955   View Richard Flatau's profileProfile Search for other posts by Richard FlatauSearch Visit Richard Flatau's homepagewww Quote Richard Flatau's postQuote
Howdy,
We visited Veronica's home in the fall of 2010 to see if any weatherizing needed to be done. The home had been up for one full year and usually there is a need for sealing a few log end that weren't perfectly dry or stuffing any primary checks that went all the way through. This cedar had been cut for 4 years, the bark was left on until 7 months before cutting to length. 70% of the cedar was split and the exterior ends were brushed/dipped with Exterior LifeLine UV Blocker from Permachink.com

   Much to our delight, there was very little weatherizing to do. A few rounds had minor shrinkage around the circumference and a few log ends had "all the way through" primary checks. We had some 30 oz. Permachink caulk tubes on hand (in light gray mortar color) and a wad of formaldahyde free, white fiberglass. We stuffed the primary checks with the white fiberglass (it looks better than pink or yellow) and slathered permachink around the log ends. We used a hand "mister" to lightly wet the mortar (for better adherence) and then smoothed the permachink around the recessed edges of the log ends and blended it with the mortar.

   We have been tried every type of caulk on the market and Permachink or Log Jam moves with the slight adjustment of the log end as it settles into its new mortar matrix home (in this case -40 degrees below zero on the outside, 70 degrees F on the inside).

   Anyhow, long story short. The home is beautiful, the owner loves it, the community loves it and plans are being made for a tribal ceremonial lodge, a commercial cordwood law office and more homes.

Here are a few uptodate pictures of this bold and beautiful home in the Minnesota's northwest.

Here is the bear paw all cleaned up and shining bright.



A paper wasp colony decided to set up shop on the far side of the house. The colony was torn down and this is what was left.





Interior of the front room, looking toward the south.



Exterior views on a cloudy day.



Happy Trails,

Richard Flatau
flato@aol.com
715-212-2870

Cordwood Information

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